Labour to expose Government's failure to deliver on infrastructure

12 February 2013

Rachel Reeves

Labour to expose Government’s failure to deliver on infrastructure

Labour will today use an Opposition Day Debate to call on the Government to bring forward infrastructure investment and build thousands more affordable homes as new figures show the failure of the Government’s National Infrastructure Plan. 

Analysis of figures published by the Government of its ‘infrastructure pipeline’ shows:

Only seven of the 576 projects (1.2 per cent) are ‘completed’ or ‘operational’. Most of these are road schemes which began under the Labour government, including one which started construction in 2007.

Just 18.2 per cent of the projects listed are said to have ‘started’ or to be ‘in construction’ or ‘under construction’. 

In addition, Labour will highlight figures showing that in the first three years of this Government capital investment is £12.8 billion lower than the plans George Osborne inherited from Labour. This follows Nick Clegg’s admission that the Government had cut capital investment too far. 

Rachel Reeves MP, Labour’s Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury, said: 

“The Government’s record on infrastructure is one of failure of ambition and failure of delivery. 

“They slashed infrastructure investment by £12.8 billion compared to the plans they inherited, which even Nick Clegg has admitted was a mistake. And even of those projects which have not been cancelled, government figures show just one in 100 have been completed and fewer than one in five have started construction. 

“The Chancellor must put this right and genuinely bring forward long-term infrastructure investment, including building thousands more affordable homes. Now is exactly the right time to be making these investments. Not only would it help to kick-start our flatlining economy and get construction workers back to work, it will also make our economy stronger and more productive for the future. 

“We also need to radically improve the decision-making, planning, delivery and finance of long-term infrastructure projects, which is why we have asked Sir John Armitt to conduct an independent review.”